Aidas Bareikis Lithuanian, b. 1967

Aidas Bareikis (b. 1967, Lithuania) graduated from the Vilnius Academy of Arts with a BA in Painting Studies in 1992. A year later, he became a Fulbright Scholar and moved to the US, obtaining an MA at the Hunter College in New York in 1997. The artist creates installations characterised by junk aesthetics, chaos and a specific use of colour.

Aidas Bareikis’s installations create an entropic, post-apocalyptic atmosphere which symbolically prophesies complete collapse and decay, at the same time showing an immense potential for new ideas and a new beginning. Creating affective, emotionally impactful scenarios in his installations Bareikis manages to combine surreal humour, social commentary and the craft of alchemy. The artist stacks and wraps cultural objects in fabric and string, building altar-like assemblages showered by paint and semi-recognisable trash. Some of the sculptures are propped up by found furniture, woodwork or aluminium structures and exposed to forces such as time, gravity or natural elements. Permeated with deep, rich colours, each work operates like a junkyard relic - a curious portal into another era slowly merging with the local flora.

Aidas Bareikis has held solo exhibitions at the Leo Koenig Inc. Gallery (NY), Marta Gallery (NY), Queens Museum (NY), Asbaek Gallery (Copenhagen), Berlin’s Contemporary Art Centre, and the Kunsthalle Wien. His work has also been presented at the Athens Biennale 2007: Destroy Athens and the Migros Museum of Contemporary Art in Zürich. Bareikis has participated in numerous group exhibitions held at various contemporary art centres, museums and galleries.

 

In Aidas Bareikis' installations one can often sense an entropic, post-apocalyptic atmosphere, which while symbolically prophesying complete collapse and decay, also presents an immense potential for new ideas and a new beginning. Bareikis, in producing emotionally affective scenarios, manages to combine surreal humour, social commentary and the craft of alchemy in his installations.
He stacks and wraps cultural objects in fabric and string, building altar-like assemblages shrouded by paint and recognizable trash. The sculptures are propped up by found furniture, wood or aluminum, and exposed to forces like time, gravity, or the elements. Rendered in deep colours each work operates like a junkyard relic: a curious portal into another era slowly merging with the local flora.

He stacks and wraps cultural objects in fabric and string, building altar-like assemblages shrouded by paint and recognizable trash. The sculptures are propped up by found furniture, wood or aluminum, and exposed to forces like time, gravity, or the elements. Rendered in deep colours each work operates like a junkyard relic: a curious portal into another era slowly merging with the local flora.